Education, corporate enslavement and Muslim society


Muslims are being indoctrinated by the education system. The ideal Muslim is not thrown into a vicious cycle of slavery by his own free will. A Muslim should not look forward to being enslaved by systems based on falsehood.
Corporate enslavement and third world culture

The Muslim society is the possessor of some of the most backwards societal views concerning education, livelihood and employment. Once a free society where students were rewarded and people’s qualifications weren’t backed by institutionalised certificates, now the very personification of enslavement to the education system. Among the religious Muslim, intellectual slavery and bankruptcy is all too common.

School has become so seemingly indispensable that it has not only become synonymous to education but made the word education secondary and complementary to it as a whole. While books of maths, physics and chemistry are prioritised, books that encourage critical thinking, self development, personal finance and so on are non-existent.

A part of the reason why Muslims have a horrific track record concerning scientific, technological or societal advancements is due to promoting education at schools in the name of status and wealth, inadvertently becoming slave to social expectations. This is a very recurring event in third-world countries where the youth is chastised for not scoring top grades at school. Parents threatening with kicking out of the house, uttering heart breaking statements such as “My love for you keeps dying with each passing day” and even in extreme cases, resorting to murder of top graders due to envy and jealousy.

While they threaten you with the fangs of poverty as a result of bad grades, they admonish financial education and self responsibility. “Get great education and money shall follow suit” they say. Whilst in their views the wealthiest elites of the world are educated nerds, they attribute the successes of “mediocre” people to luck. Muslims are thus forced into a vicious cycle of psychological slavery to do bidding for people they don’t even know just to get food on their plates.

The youth is socially coerced into pursuing medical and engineering degrees while commerce and humanities-related subjects are looked down upon. This has led to the birth of a competition to mediocrity. Mediocrity is seen as achievement among Muslims. Those that pursue business and history are socially perceived as low-scoring students or delinquents uninterested in knowledge, while those that pursue engineering, medical and law degrees to acquire wealth but end up in mediocrity are still hailed and praised by society.

While reading books unrelated to the “curriculum” is discouraged, being completely cut off from society and sacrificing the entirety of your mental capacity behind state-sponsored board exams are seen as meritorious.

While people gifted in arts, crafts, speech and other fields are subliminally alluded to be idiots, those that pursue careers in engineering and medical fields are portrayed as the epitome of a society’s intellect and success. Yet the richest and smartest people in the world don’t even come close to these fields in their specialities. Even Bill Gates dropped out of university in his second year. Steve Jobs himself studied game designing but the fields he revolutionised were barely related.

While a Muslim is obliged to be a slave to his lord, he is coerced into slavery to the government’s ploys and plans of political groups.

“I don’t want a nation of thinkers, I want a nation of workers,”

John D. Rockefeller, one of the biggest pioneers of compulsory schooling.

Educational institutions like schools and universities are certainly suited for the masses as most people will not foster the ability to form their own unique thoughts and perceptions of reality that could be of some benefit. Most people go with the flow. They flow from the mountain to the ocean like rivers. It is only the salmon that swims against the tide of the waterfall.

We live in a society where one’s merit and value are decided on a metric of how diligently can one serve corporates and institutions by sacrificing time, intellect and health. We are taught to read school textbooks and memorise irrelevant information and understand concepts that will serve no benefits in practical day-to-day life. As a consequence, we grow up disliking books as we have been taught to subconsciously perceive books as bland, lacking in depth and feeling inhumane. We seek alternate forms of entertainment and self-help in the form of videos, games, music and at times other unhealthy methods.

The disenfranchisement of those that want to seek alternate forms of education and training have no chance of building their path to success. Muslim youth that are talented in fields that are outside the education system are ostracised from their prescribed slavery mindset. People are actively discouraged from pursuing tutorship in fields of sports, entertainment, and commerce and essential skills such as communication, networking and ethics are unheard of in Muslim countries.

At the very best, these are given as passive subjects and no one has the flexibility to pursue these as their hobbies and passions. Subjects such as social sciences are just an attempt to indoctrinate the youth into jingoism in order to benefit the government and imbue bigotry, hatred and historical revisionism. It is aimed at fostering a sense of false pride in secondary and tertiary identities.

To conclude, the Muslim needs to combat this state and societally mandated indoctrination and institutional slavery of those that want to seek alternatives that are more compatible and suit our needs. A Muslim is not to be engaging in slavery to corporates and governments that seek to diminish the status of Islam and repurpose us to sacrifice ourselves behind vain causes.


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